Meeting Information


Meeting Type
Friday Provider Meeting
Date
Friday, 3/22/2019
Start
9:00 AM
End
11:00 AM
Agenda
Agenda
Summary
Rapid Rehousing Program overview and Landlord Liaison Program 6 month update. Learn the history of Rapid Rehousing, why we invest so much of our homeless response in this intervention, how it works and how the landlord liaison project supports this important intervention.
Minutes

Welcome

Welcome

  • James Pogue, Comprehensive Life Resources
  • Appreciate seeing folks who have been out sick – I’m back at work after spending the last week in bed.  I’ve never been bedridden in  my whole life.  Doing the flu shot next year
  • I hope spring is treating you well
  • Sign up to the listserv at http://www.pchomeless.org/Home/Listserv .  Remember you can use the digest feature if you’d like – which has all the e-mails for the day together in one. 
  • Also want to remind you about https://www.piercecountyresources.com/ - which has a list of all our resources in the community.  It has a map and such.  Contact Rainey Carlin ( rcarlin@cmhshare.org ) to add or update information.

Presentation

Rapid Rehousing

  • Anne Marie Edmunds, Pierce County Human Services - aedmund@co.pierce.wa.us (presentation attached –ed.)
  • Who has heard of Rapid Rehousing? – looks like everyone
  • How many folks know how Rapid Rehousing Works?  Looks the Rapid Rehousing folks know (and more who were too shy to raise their hand, I’m sure –ed)
  • Rapid Rehousing is graduated, short term financial assistance and supports in market rate, permanent housing.  That means, we support people to move in to an apartment with their own lease.  Graduated assistance allows the support to grow or shrink – it is the accordion model (I’ve always wanted a Hohner Compadre accordion – supposedly a great option for aspiring accordion players.  Accordions aren’t as portable as my trusty harmonica, but so much higher on the awesomeness scale –ed.) – it can grow or shrink as needed.  Usually it shrinks during the program.  The flexibility is in the amount of rent and the services offered.  The goal is to help folks stabilize in their new space.
  • Transitional Housing.  This model, in the 1980s, was our primary tool to end homelessness.  The Gates Foundation, through the Sound Families initiative, funded a lot of it.  Transitional Housing is site based, which means that programs would master lease an apartment and then sublet to specific people.  Full rent was paid with a maximum stay of 24 month – and most folks stayed the full time.  All services were typically required.  People had to participate in services to stay in the program.  No matter how successful they were, they had to exit in 24 months, hopefully to permanent housing
  • The Feds looked at how successful it is.  The units were used by one household for 24 months, so don’t turn over quickly. The 24 months was thought to be enough to allow folks to get their stuff together.  Folks usually didn’t start working on stability until they were near the end of the their stay.  There was a rush of activity near the end.
  • With Rapid Rehousing - by putting folks in a Permanent situation where they don’t have to transition, we increase the opportunity to increase their stability right away – people are in their own unit, where they can stay, and increase their stability.  As the financial assistance tapers off, they are more self-sufficient.
  • The Family Options Study (https://www.huduser.gov/portal/family_options_study.html - worth the read if you’re interested in how we choose to fund what we do -ed.) was done by the Federal government, looking at what is the different efficiencies of housing models - what is cost effective, time efficient, and successful.  They compared housing models to housing vouchers.  People are very stable with vouchers, for their whole live, most or all of their housing is paid.  But comparing Rapid Rehousing to Transitional Housing, they found that Rapid Rehousing has about the same percentage outcomes to permanent housing as there are in transitional housing.  However, Rapid Rehousing costs a lot less.   This study gave us information on the differences in costs between Transitional Housing and Rapid Rehousing, and Rapid Rehousing is significantly less expensive.
  • National data showed Rapid Rehousing better than Transitional Housing.  Pierce County divested of their Transitional Housing programs and invested in Rapid Rehousing.  We looked at our own data too, and total cost of transitional housing was $14,800, and Rapid Rehousing was only $5,290.  Costs have changed, but the ratio is the significant element. 
  • We do serve more folks with Rapid Rehousing.  The stay is generally less than 12 months – folks tend to stabilize at around 6 months.  They can stay for a year or 20 months or just 3 months.  The support grows and shrinks with the particular needs of the household.  We exit much quicker than from transitional housing.  For the same amount of funds, we can house more households. 
  • Move in time is longer with Rapid Rehousing, though.  With Transitional Housing, we moved folks in immediately.  With Rapid Rehousing, we use market rate housing, so we are shopping for housing.  In  Pierce County, of all the folks who stay with the program, about 50% move in within 40 days or less.  Another 27% move in in 40-80 days.  A few take a really long time – between 81 and 120 days (10%), or more than 120 days (12%). (data just warms the heart, doesn’t it. –ed)
  • The average length of stay is about 7 months.  Some programs have shorter stays and longer stays, which shows that we work to meet folks where they are and meet the needs of each family
  • Of those that move into a unit, about 85% successfully exit once they move in.  That means they have a lease in their own name and are independent,
  • Sherri – do we know if they are still housed after 1 year?  Anne Marie – we don’t follow up – be we track if they access the homeless system again, and that return rate is quite low.
  • Households average around $6,000 of financial assistance.  We look at percentage of successful exits – The least successful are those folks that we didn’t provide much financial assistance to them. 
  • About 90% of households retain their housing.  Nationally, it is about 85%.   
  • How does Rapid Rehousing fit into the fold?  Coordinated Entry is the front door to our system.  The first step is the creative conversation, or Diversion - one time assistance to get folks housed.  The Diversion conversation is an open-ended, problem solving, strength-based solution that ends in housing.  Staff provide support and limited financial support.  If folks need more funding, we put them on the priority pool.  We don’t call it a waitlist because our pool is priority-based – the most vulnerable and highest barrier get assistance first.  It isn’t a list where you have to wait your time and then you get resources.   Those that rise to the top because of vulnerability and barriers get a referral to a housing program.  A housing program is funding form the county to provide services in a specific model – like Transitional Housing or Rapid Rehousing, a program uses one of those models to end a homeless. 

Presentation

Rapid Rehousing Panel – Some questions

  • Moderator- Debra Grant, Metropolitan Development Council - dgrant@mdc-hope.org
  • The Panel
    • Fernando Ruiz, Catholic Community Services, Family Housing Network
    • Peter Benjamin, Associated Ministries
    • Kelsey Johnson, Associated Ministries
    • Clara Lee, Metropolitan Development Council
  • All Rapid Rehousing comes through Coordinated Entry – you have to go through the Diversion Conversation and such to get access to Rapid Rehousing
  • Eligibility Criteria – you must be literally homeless – homeless the night before actual program enrollment, and meet the income criteria (HUD definition of literally homeless at https://www.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/HomelessDefinition_RecordkeepingRequirementsandCriteria.pdf -ed.)
  • Debra - Who is eligible? (somehow I missed the question Debra asked, but I think this was it)
    • Kelsey - – most vulnerable – youth, families, veterans, individuals – we serve everyone.  Work on client voice, and client choice – each person is different and each plan is different. 
    • Clara – We can see someone up to 7 months – or just one or two months.  Eligibility - we accept all criminal backgrounds – but sometimes have to switch funding to what work for them (the limitations certain funders put on who the program can help and how the program can help requires lots of juggling of funding streams –ed.)
    • Fernando – Our main funding is the Tacoma Housing Authority – so some criminal backgrounds – sex offender, arson conviction or meth manufacturing conviction disqualifies someone.  Tacoma Housing Authority also requires a minor  in household.  Consolidated Homeless Grant (CHG) funds we can serve single adults – they take everyone.
    • Peter – We serve individuals and youth, but mostly families. 
  • Debra – something about what services they provide… (Again I didn’t write the question down – like, you’d think that would be a priority for my taking notes – writing down what people say – but apparently not in this case.  –ed). 
    • Peter – I work to get to know folks, find out their goals and barriers – it isn’t directed by us – rather by the clients.  We want to know what they want to do – but often what we hear are all the things that have traumatized them.  We want to help them get housing in what they want.  Housing is the first thing we work on – the stability of a roof and a bed is what makes a difference
    • Kelsey – we connect folks with employment specialists – also have a renters readiness program – which helps them learn to build relationships with landlords, be a good renter, and utilize community resources.
    • Clara – we don’t dictate to folks on how they should get their housing – the client has a voice in their journey to overcome homelessness.  We build their goals together.  We work on how we can overcome these barriers.  We want to help them be in places that are good for them – help them integrate in their community
    • Fernando – focus on client driven – and the clients’ goals.  We try to use their strengths to help them complete their plans – so they develop their stability through their own strengths.  With nudges from case managers from time to time.
  • Debra – they are talking about the services they provide.  It is a service program, and not really a subsidy program.  (I need to say this every day before I come to work – focus on the services we provide, stop thinking of these as just financial subsidy programs. Because the service connections  is where the magic is.  As Jessie J. and B.o.B. so eloquently put it, it’s “not about the money, money, money” –ed) We help with their costs and move them in housing, but it isn’t a voucher - we cannot pay rent forever.  It is about helping them be self-sufficient - able to pay their own rent.  These guys are about supporting folks goals.
  • Debra - What happens if someone fails, can they come back again.?
    • Fernando – it depends on the length they’ve been in the program.  If, 3 weeks after exit, they lose housing, we can try to re-engage and support.  We do still try to clean up any consequences as soon as possible, we want the client to not have an eviction or money owed, and we want to maintain the relationship with the landlord.
    • Peter – we try to reduce harm.  We will still always engage with folks, even if they’ve exited.  Had a couple that were coming into the fold of institutions – were 24 and had their first job.  Ended program after a year, and were exited.   They had some trouble, and we supported them for one more month.    
    • Kelsey – we try not to exit to homelessness.  We work, even after an exit, to support.
    • Clara – if someone was exited 2 years ago and they are back on the priority pool and put back in our program, we can accept them.  Some funding streams prevent us from paying a second deposit, though. 
    • Debra – the client can go back in the priority pool if they become homeless.  We don’t exit folks immediately when financial services stop.  We can continue to support them. 
  • Debra - The rules of the program are varied.  Can you serve folks who haven’t had a housing unit in their own name before
    • Clara – I’ve helped with clients with no rental history, no income.  We work to find the Cinderella shoe (but not like in the Grimm Stories where they cut off a toe or a heel to make the foot fit, I’m hoping.  Say what you will about the Disney version of stories, there is always a more gruesome version out there somewhere.  You’d think Hans Christian Andersen could have come up with a better ending than killing off the mermaid.  I’ll take the Disney version any day – especially Sebastian’s musical numbers. –ed.)  - that being a landlord willing to work with them
    • Kelsey – I work with the client’s strengths and the we provide a letter explaining what the program will provide.
  • Debra - what is the work you do to educate landlords – especially around people of color and homelessness
    • Fernando – we are lucky to have the Landlord Liaison Program team.  Before the Landlord Liaison Program, we worked with landlords on basic trauma informed care for our clients – especially for domestic violence survivors – how not to re-traumatize them.  For instance –knocking on a client’s door every day isn’t maybe right for a client.  We’ll coach the landlord to contact us to arrange a discussion with the client.
    • Kelsey – we let landlords know about the background  of clients – and how society discriminates against people of color. 
  • Debra - What if you can’t find someone you get a referral for?
    • Clara – we make at least 10 tries to get ahold of a client. We can see phone numbers and e-mails in HMIS, calling, messaging, contacting Coordinated Entry to see what the last communication was.
    • Peter – partner with our shelters – if we know they are staying in a shelter will work through the shelter to contact them
  • Debra – do people always qualify for the program when they get a Coordinated Entry referral?
    • Peter – sometimes folks are not literally homeless anymore, or have too high of income, so we can’t enroll them.
  • Debra – how do you partner for success for your clients
    • Peter – we talk about the various resources in the community, and use examples of other clients who have accessed services in the community.  We work with VADIS and Hire253 and other job programs.  Also work with mental health program in the community.  We assess needs at intake and at the 90 day review, which often helps us to know what is needed.  Our biggest needs are cell phones and transportation
  • Are there consistencies among providers?
    • Kelsey – there are, because we are all following our organizations mission – which is client focused. 
    • Fernando – a lot of the inconsistencies you hear about  has to do with how we are client-based.  We do different things for each client, and those messages get out in the community. 
    • Peter – there is a lot of misinformation, and the program model has changed since program inceptions a decade ago.  Rapid Rehousing changes over time.  Communicating that to the community is challenging.
  • What is your typical case load.
    • Clara We don’t have higher than  20 households – doing about 15 right now
    • Fernando – around 15 or 16 per Case Manager (I know you shouldn’t capitalize job titles, but it just seems clearer that way.  You’re not my boss, MLA. –ed)
    • Peter – all our clients have different needs, and we stagger our openings depending on our workloads.  I’m looking for housing for 5 households, and working on services and stability for 12 other households.  I try to meet folks once per month and have time to intervene in issues landlords bring.  We use a trauma informed, harm reduction model (have you even given the harm amplification model a try?  I’d be happy to connect you to my Aunt Betty, an expert on turning any situation into an emotional volcano… –ed).  Our time and efforts are flexible because of those things
  • Scenario – a landlord calls about a concern with a current housed client.  Like hoarding and getting evicted
    • Clara - we try to prevent things like hoarding, and discuss how we need to have water and power on.  We try to not get to a point with hoarding.  We’ll discuss a plan with the client and the landlord that will work for everyone
    • Kelsey – would work to make sure there is no harm coming from the hoarding, and that the landlords needs are met.   
  • Debra – take a look at Pierce County policies and procedures around Rapid Rehousing (https://www.co.pierce.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/25349/Homeless-Policies-07-2014-update2?bidId= -ed).  We are tied in to how we use our funding
  • Marybeth – what is renter readiness?  Peter – it was created internally, but we are partnered with Landlord Liaison Program to provide it to clients community-wide.  We want to make sure folks have the skills so they are able to successfully rent – so they know what their rights and responsibilities are around 10 day notices or 3 day pay or vacate.  Also covers how to use a credit card.  Financial counseling is a big part of getting some skills to stay housed.  Can connect to other resources, too.  They exit with a certificate. 
  • Al – What services do you provide to people with felonies or sex offenders.  Kelsey – it is what the client asks for.  We’ll do what we can.  Peter – we work with them no matter what – While being a sex offender can be a barrier to our clients, they shouldn’t be a barrier for us.  Debra – luckily we have a diversity of funding sources in the community, and we work to serve people with criminal backgrounds. 
  • Theresa – so you referred to the fact that rents have gone up in pierce county.  You have a maximum for rent – what you are looking for is something they can pay for when the subsidy ends.  How does that affect how you house people.  Fernando – that is where creativity comes into play.  When I house a client with no income, I look for a unit with below Fair Market Rent.  If I put someone in a place they can’t afford the rent, if all they have is Supplemental Security Income (SSI), they need a place they could afford.  There are some places we can rent to.  Debra – our goal is not housing being 30% of rent – we work on budgeting, but we work within the realities of what the market has to offer.  Kelsey – we work on other resources that might help them
  • Questions - How long does the referral stay open?  Where does the referral actually come from?  Fernando – we have an open referral for 7-10 business days, if no contact, I’ll close the referral back.  If the client does call 2 weeks after, we’ll bring the client into the program.  the referrals come based on the case load.  I open referrals when I need them.  Peter – it also depends a bit on funding – we may not open referrals if we are low on funding. 
  • Question – is there a current HUD program available that we can take over an apartment building with?  Peter – it is possible perhaps. 
  • Question – can you partner?  Peter – yes
  • Question – I like that you advocate for the client with the landlord.  Do you advocate for clients in the workforce as well?  MDC – I haven’t done that in the past, but if our clients wanted us to, we would.  We try to refer clients to employment providers – MDC has those resources.  Peter – while we would, that is not usually the case.  We are on the background working on job coaching, applications, and job hunting.  There is a gap where landlords are contracted through landlord liaison, but we don’t have as many employers to go through that process. 
  • Debra - Send any questions to Gerrit and he’ll get them to us– we don’t have a magic want to provide affordable housing for our clients, but we are a support system that advocates for our clients and works with them and their strengths, but we are working on being realistic.

Presentation

Landlord Liaison Project

  • Alexis Eykel, Program Director - AlexisE@AssociatedMinistries.org
  • Sean Lewis, Program Assistant - SeanL@AssociatedMinistries.org
  • Kiesha Triplett – Landlord Engagement - KieshaT@AssociatedMinistries.org
  • Who knows what we are?
  • We launched in October – did work to develop the program from January through October of last year
  • The new tenant ordinances in Tacoma do have landlords a bit scared. 
  • Landlord Liaison is a prepaid service that provides resources to landlords to incentivizes them – we supplement service providers with risk management funds
  • The overall program steps:
    • Recruit units from landlords
    • Advertise those to RRH partners
    • Fill units with rent-ready tenants
    • Provide support to property owners
  • Incentive offers
    • Quick tenant filling – no need to advertise units
    • 24-hours support hotline if there are any issues – this saves property partners from having to do a judgement or eviction – good for landlord and tenant
    • Access to risk mitigation funds
    • Tennant have access to renter readiness
  • All housing have to pass Housing Quality Standards (HQS) inspection
  • Housing needs – need housing at or below FMR that is clean and located in each school district in the County (that can’t be easy. –ed).
  • What we don’t do:
    • Handle property and case management
    • Don’t handle client screening – we wanted to do this, but lots of complexity. 
    • Don’t do housing and shelter
    • Don’t do housing assistance
  • Impact since October 2018 –
    • Gained 11 property partners – 7 private partners and 4 property management companies
    • Housed 68 people – 34 adults and 32 children. (I’m not sure what the other two are, either. –ed)
    • Out of all folks housed, we’ve had 10 total  issues
      • 2  resulted in a relocation - not a judgement or eviction, just a graceful exit (like a trip to Elba? –ed)
    • Held 6 renters readiness courses – seen increasing positive response – more tenants coming to these courses
  • Issues are pretty normal – unauthorized guests, noise complaints, large pets when there shouldn’t be.  The case managers we work with are so responsive.  I usually get an e-mail from a property manager – like someone was vomiting over the balcony, and we’ve asked them  to stop and they won’t.  We’ll have the case manager intervene to fix the issue.  We had a DV situation that was causing problems in the apartment complex.  None of these issues resulted in an eviction 
  • 2019 fundraising goal – goal of $20,000, currently raised $1,500.  Working on move-in kits.  Often renters need renters insurance, so LLP would like to provide that.
  • Questions – what is a move-in kit?   Cleaning supplies and such that folks don’t have. 
  • Reach out to us - let us know any property owner and property managers. 
  • Carolyn – how do you encourage landlords to sign up.  Are you a non-profit?  Alexis – we are a nonprofit – housed at Associated Ministries, but we have rebranded away from Associated Ministries.  I have a history with property management and as a realtor and such.  Landlords can contact me or we can reach out to them 

Good of the Order

  • Carrie - Every year for the last 10 or 11 years, we have done a community champion award.  If you candidate is selected, they are awarded $3,000 for a nonprofit of their choice and recognized in front of hundreds.  Al – a coalition or an individual.  Carrie - you really have to detail everything a person or organization does to make their community the best place ever. 
  • David – we are losing 40-year long users.  These new fentanyl-laced drugs are making it hard for folks to know what they are getting and it is killing them
  • Puyallup community Court – new court established through the Center for Court Innovation.  Our court located low risk offenders and instead of the punishment route, will do a risk and needs assessment, and instead of jail, will help find housing, will connect with drug treatment.  In the process of looking for providers that can come directly to the court – clients don’t have transportation – so coming to them will make referrals happen.  (The Puyallup Court presented a few months back – super cool program – notes from the presentation are at http://www.pchomeless.org/MeetingMinutes/Details?id=295 –ed.
  • Sherri – Valeo mini-report out - since September, 50 people in employment, $100,000 in wages, helped 16 people secure full time employment, ended homelessness for  7 households.
  • Kelly - Hire253 – April 3rd, 10am-2pm – it is huge – have 74 employers, we’ve been vetting these employers so much, with 40 employers on the waitlist – companies need to be able to interview and hire on site.  We’ll have 500 jobs available that day.  If you’d like to volunteer, you get a bright yellow vest, and get to help job seekers one-on-one.  We have so many people and resources coming in.  We can have up to 1,500 people in the building, and we’ll be providing free lunch (people say there is no such thing as a free lunch, but in this case, our clients get both a free lunch and a job – not too shabby. –ed).

Coming Attractions

Coming Attractions

  • April 3rd – Hire253
  • April 5th – Korean Women’s Association – programs overview
  • April 12th – the new The Coffee Oasis youth Shelter overview
  • April 19th –Something youth-y
  • April 26th – Child care for households experiencing homelessness
  • May 3rd – Should scientists genetically engineer dinosaurs or focus more on killer robots to hasten humanity towards Armageddon and the new divine dispensation that will follow?  Our panel of experts includes 2 apparently ethical members of the scientific community, author Tim LaHaye, and someone that looks remarkably like Ed McMahon.  Listen to the facts, consider the evidence, and make your decision.  Bonus - bearded dragons at wholesale prices will be available for budding geneticists. 

 

Restaurant Review

In my early 20’s I lived for a year in Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood.  Fremont was sort of mid-gentrification at that point (sadly, I was doing my part).  There were still lots of bikers and students and artists taking advantage of cheap apartments.  I was treading water, career-wise - I didn’t get in graduate school on my first try, so was juggling a few different jobs and being as close to living a bohemian as I’ll ever be.  I worked lots of odd little jobs, most with weird hours (like a 2 night a week graveyard night auditor shift at a downtown hotel).  I often found myself in Downtown Seattle around noon with my bike and nothing on my calendar the rest of the day.  I’d bike over to Pike Place market and fill my bag with the makings of dinner.  I had my favorite fishmonger and green grocer, but I really just loved the flood of people – tourists, locals, the young, the old – with every corner of the world represented there.  It has been 20 years since I left Seattle, and I don’t miss Seattle at all.  But I do wish Tacoma had its own Pike Place Market.  When I go to Seattle, I try to make a stop at Pike Place.  I hit my fishmonger (and hope she has those fresh spot shrimp) and the usual places.  And the Daily Dozen Donuts (93 Pike Street at Pike Place Market, Seattle WA 98101).  If you say the word “Seattle” to my kids, I suspect will immediately think of a mini-donut.  We always get mini-donuts when we are at Pike Place.  Always.  There is usually a line, but it is worth the wait.  Why?  For starters, they have an automated Donut Robot Mark II conveyer belt donut fryer.  I want one of those so bad.  No, I don’t know where I’d put it, but I would make it work, somehow.  Anyway, as you wait in line, you get to watch the donut machine in action.  They only have like 4 kinds of donuts – plain, cinnamon, powdered sugar, and “fancy” – meaning chocolate glazed with sprinkles.  They sell them by the dozen, and I always get a dozen (or two) assorted.  Warning – they only take cash.  They have a little spot you can eat them, or you can wander the market and munch on them.  Often, the donuts are still warm – and that, my friends, is good living.  So, hit Pike Place, do some people watching, and enjoy a mini-donut.

Attendees

  • Sheila Miraflor, Molina Healthcare
  • Tony Lewis, Landlord Liaison Program
  • Alexis Eykel, Landlord Liaison Program 
  • Peter Benjamin, Associated Ministries
  • Kiesha Triplett, Landlord Liaison Program
  • Kelsey Johnson, Associated Ministries
  • Maira Mariscal, Associated Ministries
  • Clara Le, Metropolitan Development Council
  • Debra Grant, Metropolitan Development Council
  • CC Mendoza, Metropolitan Development Council
  • Martha Shephard, Tacoma Salvation Army
  • Ashley DeCaro, Stand up for Kids
  • Kyle Paskewitz, Stand up for Kids
  • Meridee Heimlich, Step by Step
  • Byron Corzo, Comprehensive Life Resources
  • Sam Miller, Comprehensive Life Resources
  • Fernando Ruiz, Catholic Community Services
  • Maira Castanon, Catholic Community Services
  • Marilyn Veasley-Gagner, Catholic Community Services
  • Joseph Sanders, Tacoma Rescue Mission
  • Theresa Power-Drutis, New Connections
  • Emily Less, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department
  • William Stinson, Catholic Community Services
  • Brandon Ault, Catholic Community Services
  • Bill Harrison, Community Medicare
  • Carrie Ching, Molina Healthcare
  • Marge Blount, Pierce County Health Department
  • Bryan Green, Olive Crest – Safe Families for Children
  • Jessica Heck, Network Tacoma
  • Bruce Morris, Tacoma Transportation Commission and Chaplain, Tacoma Fire Department
  • Larry Seaquist, League of Women Voters
  • Al Ratcliffe, me
  • Barbara Kaelberer
  • Patricia Menzies, just me now
  • David Venes, Dave Purchase Projects
  • Stephanie Wright, Adonai Counseling
  • Bobby Ocasio, City of Tacoma
  • Veronica Falfafine, Bridges of Love Northwest
  • Anne Marie Edmunds, Pierce County Human Services
  • Mel Leary, Comprehensive Life Resources
  • Calvin Kennon Sr, Comprehensive Life Resources
  • Diane Dougherty, Community Volunteer
  • Anna Behrens, Coordinated Care
  • Eric Hasstedt, Safe Streets
  • Carolyn Read, St. Leos
  • RoxAnne Simon, Safe Streets
  • Elizabeth Bruce, Puyallup community Court
  • Marybeth McCarthy, Tacoma Community College
  • Susan Pfundt, Adult Protective Service
  • Sandra Sych, Pierce County AIDs Foundation
  • Sherri Jensen, Valeo Vocation
  • Kelly Blucher, Goodwill Industries
  • Tracy Jones, Shepherd’s Transformation Mansions Homeless Program
  • Judy Flannigan, Tacoma Salvation Army
  • Andrea Sanz, Tacoma Rescue Mission